Why is the fastest growing group of entrepreneurs — black women — largely ignored by the investment community?

Why is the fastest growing group of entrepreneurs — black women — largely ignored by the investment community?

Back in college, Rachel Hankerson came up with the idea for an electronic license plate. After losing her job during the recession, she decided to get her invention off the ground, but has has trouble attracting local investors, even though states have expressed interest and other companies have popped up with similar technology. TIM LLOYD | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Back in college, Rachel Hankerson came up with the idea for an electronic license plate. After losing her job during the recession, she decided to get her invention off the ground, but has has trouble attracting local investors, even though states have expressed interest and other companies have popped up with similar technology. TIM LLOYD | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

ON THIS EPISODE … we bring you stories about the fastest growing group of entrepreneurs: black women. And we explore the huge gap between business opportunities this group is creating for itself and its longstanding lack of access to capital from the investment community.

The episode is full of voices of black women entrepreneurs, from a local baker to the founder of Blavity. 

We also hear from experts in the investment community, and bring you news of several efforts — local and national — aimed at creating a more inclusive startup scene.

Insurance insecurity: The future of the ACA and an alternate model

Insurance insecurity: The future of the ACA and an alternate model

Context, interpretation and intent clash in controversial St. Louis art exhibit